Adult survivors of childhood brain tumors may struggle to live independently


(Reuters Health) – Adults who had brain cancer as children may have a harder time living independently and having rich professional and personal lives than people who didn’t have these tumors in childhood, a U.S. study suggests.

The 306 childhood brain tumor survivors in the study were 26 years old on average and had typically been diagnosed with cancer about 18 years earlier. Overall, 40 percent had achieved levels of independence similar to what might be seen in 20-somethings without a history of cancer, managing things like a home of their own, a job, a driver’s license, and a…



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